Summer Highlights | Fellows share their stories from South Africa

 

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach With Africa in The New York Times The New York Times article “New Schools in South Africa Serve the Underserved,” by Celia W. Dugger, highlights the...

 
 

Molweni from South Africa!

As we pass the halfway point for our Fellows in South Africa, Maren Anderson spoke with two of our Fellows to learn more about their experiences. Upon their return to their schools at home, our Fellows will continue to work with the teachers they partnered with in their Leap placements to continue their professional development and the sharing of ideas in education.

BobThayer, placed in Leap 1 in Langa Township in Cape Town, reflects on his time:

“I spent a week in Johannesburg [for the] Global Teachers Institute Axis Summit. The experience was amazing and difficult to describe, but I will try…

Johannesburg is bursting with street art, singing, and politics, and the Axis Summit was no exception. Aspiring educators and experienced teachers attended workshops and worked toward making a positive and real change for a better South Africa.

I finished my first week at a high school in Langa Township in Cape Town where I’ve been observing, teaching and playing chess with the learners (students). I am staying with Sabelo Skanjane, who is a history teacher, and his family. We typically have lengthy conversations after dinner each night about South African history, hip-hop, and world affairs. I am halfway through my one month stay and I am feeling the time fly by.”

Clara Gurriaran, who has been given a Zulu name, Nukokhanya, meaning “light”, is placed in Leap 3 in Alexandra Township outside of Johannesburg.

“What I can tell you about my time at the Summit is the amount of interesting conversations that I was able to take part, was something that I had never experienced. Being able to spend 4 days surrounded by student teachers and experienced educators who shared their view on global issues, simple ideas on lesson planning and their amazing creativity, was something that I won’t forget. I now understand that this was the start of a lifelong relationship between educators from not only South Africa, but the States, Zimbabwe, and Spain.

I am amazed by the ability of the students to think critically, make connections to the real world and their choice of words when it comes to discussing social issues. [On] Nelson Mandela day, I was in grade 12 English and decided to start a debate on Apartheid and human rights. I had the students assume roles (for and against, representatives from the government, etc.) and the result was amazing. Such deep conversations, discussions, and ideas.

I have been recording my grade 8 students, or “learners”, as they say here, while they sing traditional Zulu songs. I love their culture, their positivity and that they want to share all of that with me. I have also been organizing and cleaning the library and found an Octavio Paz poem book (with English translations) and have been reading some poems to the kids. They love to hear and learn a bit of Spanish and I love to bring poetry a little bit closer to them.

I have also been buying breakfast with them. I tell my host to drop me off a couple of streets before the school and I buy “amagwinya” with them, deep-fried dough balls that I love. I chat with the learners, eat and walk to school together. I really enjoy spending time with them. I have bought some fabrics and they have been helping me to learn how to wear a “doek”, the headscarf. And they laugh a lot because I love to wear the South African look.

I am trying to write a very short speech in Zulu for the last community meeting this Friday to try to express how grateful I am to be here, all that I have learned and the impact that both teachers and learners have had on me. I will also try to make parts of a map of the world in the different classes and build the whole map all together on Friday. My idea is to have every class write on their “class piece of the map” what culture means to them. And then we will have a big map with words in Zulu, Xhosa, English, Spanish, etc. with many ideas about culture.

Summer Highlights | Fellows share their stories from South Africa

 

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach With Africa in The New York Times The New York Times article “New Schools in South Africa Serve the Underserved,” by Celia W. Dugger, highlights the...

 
 

Molweni from South Africa!

As we pass the halfway point for our Fellows in South Africa, Maren Anderson spoke with two of our Fellows to learn more about their experiences. Upon their return to their schools at home, our Fellows will continue to work with the teachers they partnered with in their Leap placements to continue their professional development and the sharing of ideas in education.

BobThayer, placed in Leap 1 in Langa Township in Cape Town, reflects on his time:

“I spent a week in Johannesburg [for the] Global Teachers Institute Axis Summit. The experience was amazing and difficult to describe, but I will try…

Johannesburg is bursting with street art, singing, and politics, and the Axis Summit was no exception. Aspiring educators and experienced teachers attended workshops and worked toward making a positive and real change for a better South Africa.

I finished my first week at a high school in Langa Township in Cape Town where I’ve been observing, teaching and playing chess with the learners (students). I am staying with Sabelo Skanjane, who is a history teacher, and his family. We typically have lengthy conversations after dinner each night about South African history, hip-hop, and world affairs. I am halfway through my one month stay and I am feeling the time fly by.”

Clara Gurriaran, who has been given a Zulu name, Nukokhanya, meaning “light”, is placed in Leap 3 in Alexandra Township outside of Johannesburg.

“What I can tell you about my time at the Summit is the amount of interesting conversations that I was able to take part, was something that I had never experienced. Being able to spend 4 days surrounded by student teachers and experienced educators who shared their view on global issues, simple ideas on lesson planning and their amazing creativity, was something that I won’t forget. I now understand that this was the start of a lifelong relationship between educators from not only South Africa, but the States, Zimbabwe, and Spain.

I am amazed by the ability of the students to think critically, make connections to the real world and their choice of words when it comes to discussing social issues. [On] Nelson Mandela day, I was in grade 12 English and decided to start a debate on Apartheid and human rights. I had the students assume roles (for and against, representatives from the government, etc.) and the result was amazing. Such deep conversations, discussions, and ideas.

I have been recording my grade 8 students, or “learners”, as they say here, while they sing traditional Zulu songs. I love their culture, their positivity and that they want to share all of that with me. I have also been organizing and cleaning the library and found an Octavio Paz poem book (with English translations) and have been reading some poems to the kids. They love to hear and learn a bit of Spanish and I love to bring poetry a little bit closer to them.

I have also been buying breakfast with them. I tell my host to drop me off a couple of streets before the school and I buy “amagwinya” with them, deep-fried dough balls that I love. I chat with the learners, eat and walk to school together. I really enjoy spending time with them. I have bought some fabrics and they have been helping me to learn how to wear a “doek”, the headscarf. And they laugh a lot because I love to wear the South African look.

I am trying to write a very short speech in Zulu for the last community meeting this Friday to try to express how grateful I am to be here, all that I have learned and the impact that both teachers and learners have had on me. I will also try to make parts of a map of the world in the different classes and build the whole map all together on Friday. My idea is to have every class write on their “class piece of the map” what culture means to them. And then we will have a big map with words in Zulu, Xhosa, English, Spanish, etc. with many ideas about culture.

JKW Foundation donates $10K to Teach With Africa

 

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach With Africa in The New York Times The New York Times article “New Schools in South Africa Serve the Underserved,” by Celia W. Dugger, highlights the...

 
 

“Apartheid and similar policies, both there and here, wound the oppressor as well as the oppressed. The lack of common humanity trickles down and poisons us all.”

– From the “A Lesson From Aloes” panel discussion

On Sunday, June 24th, TWA founders Larry and Marjorie Schlenoff had the great pleasure of joining Dr. Aletha Harven in a panel discussion after the performance of Athol Fugard’s play, “A Lesson from Aloes“, at Z Space in San Francisco.

As a community outreach partner, what we did not anticipate, was a phone call from the actress/producer, Wendy Vanden Heuvel, offering Teach With Africa an unrestricted (and unsolicited) grant from her family foundation, JKW Foundation, for $10,000!

We are so grateful to Wendy Vanden Heuvel and JKW Foundation for this generous donation which will have a significant impact on Teach With Africa‘s capacity to expand our global education program.

Updates from our Global Teachers Institute Program & Welcoming the 2018 Fellows!

 

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach With Africa in The New York Times The New York Times article “New Schools in South Africa Serve the Underserved,” by Celia W. Dugger, highlights the...

 
 

In March, 8 teachers from various regions of South Africa traveled to the San Francisco to be placed in Bay Area schools. Through an exchange of teaching and learning, teaching peers can share best practices, form mentoring relationships, connect culturally, and collaborate on strategies to bring about equality in education in both countries.


We are delighted to introduce our 2018 TWA Fellows! Clara Bas, Shaneeka Favors, Bob Thayer, and Clifford Sykes fly to Johannesburg to kick off the second half of our exchange at the 2018 GTI Axis Summit. This fellowship aims to facilitate an authentic platform for fellows and their South African hosts to learn from one another, improve their instructional practices, and shift the international engagement paradigm from one of giving and taking to co-creation and sharing.

Follow #GTIAxisSummti2018 #AspireBuildCollaborate and @globalteachersinstitute on Instagram for exciting updates from the Summit!

LEAP student excels through leadership in her community

 

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach With Africa in The New York Times The New York Times article “New Schools in South Africa Serve the Underserved,” by Celia W. Dugger, highlights the...

 
 

“A Grade 12 Dieplsoot pupil, Morongwa Ramasobane, is all that a youth should be, she is positive minded, helpful and hard working. This was revealed by Aveng Community Investment Trust, a socio-economic development organisation that supports youths with educational resources and character building.

‘This month, as we commemorate Youth Day and pay tribute to the 1976 generation of young [pupils] who helped bring about much-needed change in our country, we are particularly inspired by some of the [pupils] at our Diepsloot school who are showing great commitment to building our nation. One such person is Morongwa Ramasobane, a Grade 12 at Leap,’ said Sorita van Tonder, Aveng communication manager.”

We are thrilled to hear about LEAP student, Morongwa Ramasobane, making a difference in her community. To read the whole story, click on the link: “Diepsloot Grade 12 pupil a shining example”

Diepsloot_Grade_12_pupil_a_shining_example___Fourways_Review

EdTech Summit South Africa 2014 reached 19,300 students by providing 91 hands-on workshops to 772 South African principals, teachers and education professionals across five provinces

 

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach With Africa in The New York Times The New York Times article “New Schools in South Africa Serve the Underserved,” by Celia W. Dugger, highlights the...

 
 

TWA_logo_squareedunova_logo_redoLEAP_logo_redo

Web

EdTech Summit South Africa 2015 is scheduled for August…as part of a four-partner collaboration,Teach With Africa, K2 Productions Global, LEAP Science and Maths Schools and Edunova organized, produced and delivered six one-day professional development events as part of the second annual EdTech Summit South Africa. In 2014 the six individual events were held across five provinces.

Between 2 and 13 August 2014, as part of a four-partner collaboration, Teach With Africa, K2 Productions Global, LEAP Science and Maths Schools and Edunova organized, produced and delivered six one-day professional development events as part of the second annual EdTech Summit South Africa. The six individual events were held across five provinces.

EdTech Summit South Africa aims to deliver high quality professional development to teachers serving in under-served and under-resourced South African schools, enabling teachers and education practitioners, who would otherwise not have access to this kind of professional development, to develop and grow their own education technology skills and competencies in order to impact more engaged learners and improved educational outcomes. The Summit also puts technology into the hands of teachers through exciting giveaways of donated technology and seeks to connect global classrooms by integrating an international presentation team with local presenters and audiences.

Educators from many schools receive a full day of integrated information and communication technology (ICT) education professional development. A well-balanced mix of international and local presenters make up the team that delivers 14-18 hands-on workshops, as well as an engaging keynote presentation. Content is leveled at various IT competencies, and is inclusive of the various levels of skill among attendees. Workshops cover a wide range of topics, representative of relevant content and pedagogy currently perceived as best practice including: gamification in math education, open source courseware, using cloud-based technology in schools, social justice and online media, mobile devices to promote engaged learning, a physical science focus, the academic use of social media, project based teaching and learning and the hands-on approach to teaching STEM, using and creating multimedia, online assessment, global networking to overcome challenge and 3D animation to support learning.

Local presenters join the international team in each Summit location delivering very engaging sessions. The participants arrive eager and determined to learn and share; immersing themselves into each and every workshop session with a deep sense of collaboration and practical implementation. As the day progresses, excitement levels around the use of technology and innovative teaching strategies in local classrooms grow. The fun and learning-filled day ends on high note with technology giveaways going into the hands of teachers, ready to take back the growth and learning into their schools.

EdTech

DATA AND IMPACT

Summit Attendees registered Attendees present Number of workshops International presenters Local presenters
Johannesburg 93 105 18 7 11
Jane Furse 116 110 14 8 7
Ladysmith (1) 20 37 10 7 3
Ladysmith (2) 18 18 4 3 1
Durban 153 149 11 7 3
Cape Town 151 164 18 8 10
East London 197 189 16 4 6
TOTAL 748 772 91 10 30

EdTech Summit South Africa activities in 2014 reached an estimated 19,300 students!

EdTech Summit South Africa 2014 saw an international and South African presentation team of 40 expert education technology professionals deliver 91 hands-on workshops to 772 South African principals, teachers and education professionals across five provinces. This professional development intervention has directly impacted every single participant who attended sessions where technology was put into their hands as part of the teaching and learning experience. More than 100 pieces of technology were given away to participants including laptops, tablets, projectors and educational content enabling teachers to leave with a new skill set as well as the tools needed to turn the intervention into longer term, sustainable implementation in their classrooms. An estimated 19,300 South African students were impacted by this program.

Click here to view additional photos of the EdTech Summit South Africa 2014
Download the Report

 

Read More:
Website: www.edtechsummitsouthafrica.com
Blog: http://edtechsummitsouthafrica.wordpress.com/

 

 

Team4Tech Study Centre Installation & Training Project

 

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach With Africa in The New York Times The New York Times article “New Schools in South Africa Serve the Underserved,” by Celia W. Dugger, highlights the...

 
 
TWA Blog

LEAP tutors, Team4Tech team and Karen Page (Teach With Africa) at the completion of the training workshop.

Team4TechTeach With Africa and LEAP Science and Maths Schools joined forces in August to create a tutoring center in the heart of the Langa Township, Cape Town. The 7-person Team4Tech team delivered 40 hours of digital literacy and 21st century education skills training to 22 tutors serving the LEAP school in Cape Town.  The program also included developing and loading customized software on 25 laptop computers and converting a shipping container into a fully equipped tutoring center.

“Teach With Africa was the pivotal partner to bring together the need, the opportunity and the project management,” said Noel Durrant, Program Director at Team4Tech. “We were delighted to have volunteers from Box and Intel, experienced Team4Tech alumni and great collaboration with Teach With Africa to deliver a project with outstanding results.”

Engagement with the tutors provided them with a new set of teaching skills, and after the program, LEAP Executive Director, John Gilmour, reports that tutors are using their training to be more involved in the process of finding the educational methods and solutions that work for their learners.  Some tutors reported that the Team4Tech program was a “life changing” opportunity in the way they view their work and their responsibility to learners.  And there is promise for the Langa community too – after hearing about the program, one government official called for more education technology offerings to serve the Langa community. Based on the outstanding outcomes, Team4Tech, LEAP and Teach With Africa have opened discussions for another project in 2015.

View photos from the Langa project here.
Download the press release here.

twa blog 2

Noel Durrant and Karen Page celebrate the opening of the LEAP Science and Maths School Study Facility with Glen Rose, the community leader of Langa.

Welcoming our South African Educator Team

 

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach With Africa in The New York Times The New York Times article “New Schools in South Africa Serve the Underserved,” by Celia W. Dugger, highlights the...

 
 

2014 SA Team in USA

Teach With Africa is pleased to announce the arrival of our team of eight educators from South Africa as participants in our sixth annual South Africa-USA Educator Exchange Program 

This dynamic team includes two young teachers from LEAP Schools in Limpopo and Johannesburg, as well as four student-teachers from LEAP Johannesburg and Cape Town, and two student-teachers from Inanda Seminary in Durban.  This is our most geographically diverse team yet!

We are thrilled that this year’s team includes an expansion of our program to work with schools from the South African Extraordinary Schools Coalition.  Special thanks to the administrators, faculty liaisons, mentor teachers and staff at our host schools who continue to partner with us and deepen the impact of this unique exchange.

Our 2014 host schools are: The Branson School, Katherine Delmar Burke School, Drew School, The Hamlin School, and Kehillah Jewish High School. We would also like to extend our gratitude to the eight host families who have opened their homes and hearts to welcome our team into their families for the next month.

Read the bios and see photos of our talented team.

Returning Home

 

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach With Africa in The New York Times The New York Times article “New Schools in South Africa Serve the Underserved,” by Celia W. Dugger, highlights the...

 
 

By Kristen Goggin – Town School for Boys – edTech Summit Team
August 23, 2013 

“There is nothing like returning to a place that remains unchanged to find ways in which you yourself have altered” -Nelson Mandela A Long Walk to Freedom 1994

Friends ask, how was South Africa? I reply, “It was Amazing!”  They expect more and listen intently as I reply, “Cape Town is gorgeous, I loved the ocean side scenery.  The food was amazing. I was eating things I couldn’t even recognize on Safari.  Safari?   I saw a Lion.  I saw a Hippo. Holy Elephants and Giraffes!  What’s a Springbok!  Melville (Joburg suburb/neighborhood) was so cute and we had impromptu music jam night that was off the hook.  My inn was gorgeous.  I crack at the surface of my adventure and I give information about the tourist experiences I had.

With very few people, I have reflected beyond this.  Others, who I know want to hear the deeper connections and details I have put off.  My mind is still racing.  It feels surreal that one week ago I was teaching an amazing group of educators about Social Media, Project Based Learning and Flipped Classrooms.  It was one week ago that while I was in the position of presenter, it was me who was learning so much. It was just about one week ago that the lump in my throat wouldn’t dissipate as I watched teachers celebrate their winnings in our daily draws… headphones, cd’s, microphones and computers. How could they be excited about an 8 year old computer? I now knew why.  Their tool kits had been added to, they were off to discover new ways to inspire their students.

It was one week ago that I had to nod goodbye to many folks, Including Victor who had spent time 3 weeks at Town School last year, because that lump in my throat had turned into tears running down my eyes as I thought about  what WE had accomplished.  Leap School Teachers being the center of that WE, not us presenters.

blog 5Coming full circle with Leap School and being able to travel to South Africa was an experience of a lifetime.  And while I have already discussed that the trip was much more about what I learned, then what I was able to share (at least for me personally) I have to acknowledge that these two things are entwined.  It certainly did a lot for my own professional growth as it pertains to outreach, learning, and global bridge building,  They say you learn the most about yourself when you are challenged emotionally.   We all were. But I traveled with a supportive group of educators that listened to my stories, laughed at my jokes, and gave themselves to me as a support system unconditionally for 15 days… and we rarely left one another’s sides.  I learned. I learned. I learned.  Hey, perhaps one of them can tell you about my trip to South Africa, because I am still struggling with the words.

So, “How was South Africa?” to be honest, I don’t really know what to say.  I am not being short on purpose. I am not trying to blow off the experience.  It was deep.  It was meaningful. It was educational.  It certainly was amazing. So I challenge you, just like I challenge my students all the time, to ask me a specific question, a deep question, one that may encourage a more thoughtful response.  I sure do have a story or two to share.

blog 6

“How did you feel as a white person learning about the Apartheid?,

“What were the township schools like and how did you feel when visiting them?”

“Were the teachers of Leap excited to learn alongside you, how did you know?

“Did you come in contact with any people that thought apartheid was the right thing for South Africa?”

“Would you go back and why?”

“What were your top 5 moments? What were you top 5 challenging moments?”

The city of San Francisco is exactly how I left it. In time I will share an anecdote or two that gives you some insight as to how I have altered because of my journey.

bog 7

 

Ayoba and Making the LEAP!

 

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach With Africa in The New York Times The New York Times article “New Schools in South Africa Serve the Underserved,” by Celia W. Dugger, highlights the...

 
 

By Kristen Goggin – Town School for Boys – edTech Summit Team
Original Post on August 17, 2013

While this is certainly not my last blog entry about my experience here in South Africa, I write this entry with a heavy heart as my time here is coming to an end and many “see you laters” have already been exchanged.

blog 4

My friend Luntu described his feeling about the Ed Tech Summit as “Ayoba”.  “Ayoba is a slang term used by South Africans to express amazement. It is derived from other slang terms, like “Ayeye” or “Ayoyoyo.” It was originally meant as an approval/appreciation of good dancing, although the exact origins of the phrase are unknown. It is thought to have roots in Johannesburg township culture. It is however, uniquely South African and expresses delight, excitement, agreement and approval. It is also used as a greeting.” -this is straight from the internet

“Ayoba” is certainly the way I feel today.  Luntu hit the nail on the head.

Ed Tech Summit South Africa has been exactly that for me.  My 3 days with the Northern South Africa Leap School teachers have been filled with delight, excitement, agreement and approval. And while I won’t get into the exacts of my conferences and conversations today, I am feeling very grateful.  Grateful for being here, grateful for the opportunity.  Grateful for having the opportunity to share and grateful for the opportunity to learn.  Leap Teachers and collaborators, you have certainly given me much more than I could have possibly given you.  I hope we can work together in the days, weeks, months and years to come.  #technologywillkeepustogether

While thinking about this post, I began reflecting on the LEAP metaphor that was introduced to me in Cape Town.  I am sure this metaphor was created for the students of LEAP School, but I challenge all of my new friends here in South Africa, all of the educators involved with Leap School, to remember that we are all students learning to keep up with the changing technology in this world.

This metaphor certainly describes the experiences you will have as you embrace technology in education.  It certainly captures my own experiences with educational technology, project based learning and global education initiatives. The first steps have been taken, training has begun… no matter where you personally fall on this metaphor today, know that I have your back when you stumble, and I ask that you have mine.  Run, stumble, LEAP, land and do it all again… this is what being a connected educator requires.  Thank You Leap.  This is not goodbye but rather SEE YOU LATER!  I can’t wait.  The journey has only just begun.

 

 

Stories from the Field: Trust Without Wavering

 

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach With Africa in The New York Times The New York Times article “New Schools in South Africa Serve the Underserved,” by Celia W. Dugger, highlights the...

 
 

Kim Worthy

By Kim Worthy
2011 & 2012 TWA Fellow from Howard University Middle School of Math and Science, Washington, D.C.

Last year I took a LEAP into the unknown, spending two months in South Africa…but not just in South Africa, in the LEAP Science and Maths School in South Africa. LEAP is not just a school, it is a movement. It is a movement towards self-awareness, self-reliance and self-determination; a movement towards consciousness and emotional and intellectual awareness; a movement towards community responsibility and community development; a movement towards reclaiming culture, history, and of course, Ubuntu….humanity.  After two months of working with the faculty, staff and students of LEAP 1 and LEAP 2, I left South Africa with a deep awareness of my intentions, my behaviors, my thoughts, my feelings, and my “unique ways.” I knew where they came from, where I learned them, and how they impacted my life, my family’s lives, my students’ lives, and everyone else in my life. The honest reflections were difficult to swallow, but because of the “trust that was birthed from the honesty” we shared, and because of the promise of “NO JUDGMENT,” I was able to receive the reflections. Being open to these honest reflections, I was able to sit with the feelings that came with them, and learn from them. I was inspired to liberate myself from my habits and behaviors that I was previously unaware of, which had impacted others and myself. My experience in LEAP last year made me feel free, whole, normal, and human, and I was inspired to change and grow.

When I learned that I would be going back to LEAP as a 2012 Teach With Africa Teacher Training Fellow, I felt fortunate and thrilled. I waited all school year to fly back to South Africa to see everyone I deeply value at LEAP, and to return to the place that inspires me to “share as much as possible” and to change. I yearned to be with the LEAP family who SEES me, FEELS me, SUPPORTS me, and ACCEPTS me without conditions; I yearned to be around others who are just as open to feeling human. I wanted to reflect with others who genuinely care, offer my reflections, receive their honest reflections, and simply experience humanity for the second time in my life. My intention was to return to give all that I could give, and to feel human again. I gave my word that I would return to share, and I waited for my return with great anticipation.

Teach With Africa Launches 2018 Thumbs Up for Education Year-End Campaign with Fall Celebration!

 

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach With Africa in The New York Times The New York Times article “New Schools in South Africa Serve the Underserved,” by Celia W. Dugger, highlights the...

 
 


Our year-end campaign began with a successful Fall Celebration graciously hosted by Evin Gelleri, owner and general manager of Sessions at the Presidio in San Francisco.  Supported by our generous donors, guests enjoyed mingling and catching up with Nigel Richard, Director of the Global Teachers Institute and Maren Anderson, Chief Operating Officer of Teach With Africa. Nigel and Maren shared recent developments: this summer, combined US/South African teams plan to expand into rural Zambia to help train teachers of the youngest and most vulnerable children.

Our sponsors and silent auction donors provided the TWA Fall Celebration with a wonderful assortment of gifts that delighted our guests with a highlight auction item of a 3-night stay at the exclusive Chitwa Chitwa Safari Lodge. We are incredibly thankful to Matthew Brink who came from South Africa to personally introduce our bidders to the unique experience of Chitwa Chitwa, including the knowledge that every guest contributes to the Wisani Preschool in the adjacent village.

Thank you to our sponsors and silent auction donors!

Sessions at the Presidio * Chitwa Chitwa Safari Lodge * Maverick Salon
Kaur Photography* Heather Summerz Photography * Joshua Ets-Hokin Studio
Photograph & Frame * Chester Santos, Memory Class * Tiffany & Co.
Boulevard Restaurant * Calfia Vineyards  * Tennis Pro Lance Johnson
Harbor Point * Tennis Pro Macall Andreas * Mersea
Maybecks Restaurant * Fior d’Italia Restaurant * Sarah Steinbreder Mortgage Broker

Thank you to our wonderful volunteers for their time and talents:
Dee Dee Littrell, Shannon Wagner, Thel Wong, Kay, Kenna Kryger, Andrin Foster, Danelle Leong, and our three youngest volunteers, Ella, Sadie, and Audrey.

View photos from event >

3rd annual GTI Axis Summit a true success!

 

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach with Africa and LEAP in The New York Times

Teach With Africa in The New York Times The New York Times article “New Schools in South Africa Serve the Underserved,” by Celia W. Dugger, highlights the...

 
 

Teachers from Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, Palm Beach, FL, and from San Francisco, CA traveled from the United States to South Africa at the end of July to lead workshops and participate in inspirational educational discussions. Each of them then traveled to various schools within the LEAP school system, to work with teachers on professional development and curriculum planning.

Read more about these teachers participating in this year’s educator exchange (2017 Teach With Africa Bios).

Quotes and messages from the Fellows after the Global Teachers Summit and prior to their school placements:

Stephanie Hayden (SH):

Maren Anderson: What are your impressions after these four days of this educators summit? What have you taken away?
SH: “I looked at the Summit schedule from last year, and compared it to other conferences I’ve gone to in the past. I thought that this summit was very novel because the teachers we hosted in our workshops were wanting more, and it’s not that they are lacking the prerequisites, but they are lacking on the ‘how to.’ By having this summit, we are making sure that after the 23 years of the Bantu Education Act, that the teachers are ready to meet the world, and the world is ready to meet them. We want them to impact on the educators, who may not have access to resources, that they are able to fulfill their dreams and fulfill the dreams of their learners.”

Maren Anderson: What are you looking forward to in your school placement?
SH: “I am looking forward to learning from them, and sharing with them whatever I can, and to collaboration and partnership with them

Kim Harper (KH):

Maren Anderson: What are your impressions after these four days of this educators summit? What have you taken away?
KH: “The summit was positive, engaging, and the work rigorous. What we asked the Aspiring Teachers to do was rigorous.”

Maren Anderson: What are you looking forward to in your school placement?
KH: “I am looking forward to a continuation of this professional learning mindset.  Using the energy from the Summit and taking it back to my LEAP placement (LEAP 5- Alexandra), and to be a resource to remind them of what was here. I want to help remind them their commitment to what they learned.”

Clifford Sykes (CS):

Marjorie Schlenoff: We are honored to have Clifford Sykes on his second educational exchange with us. Here are some of his comments on the exchange.
CS: “I am the one who is honored- to be accepted two years to assist in a work that is to urgent and important. Thank [you] for giving me an opportunity. As I said to the staff at LEAP 6 this week, it is my most fervent desire that when I leave, that my presence will have been meaningful to the staff and inspirational and challenging to the learners.”